Category Archives: News & Archives

Tiny, Logical Robots Injected into Cockroaches

Nanotechnology just got a little bit smarter. At the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Israel's Bar-Ilan University, Ido Bachelet led a team of scientists in building tiny robots that can respond to chemical cues and operate inside a living animal. More than that, they can operate as logic gates, essentially acting as real…
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A Cure for Ageing? David Sinclair talks about the fight against aging

Can we really cure ageing? David Sinclair thinks so, and he's going to try to prove it. David Sinclair is a scientist and entrepreneur working on increasing human health, productivity, and lifespan. After co-discovering a molecular cause of aging at the Massachusetts Institute in Boston in the mid-1990s, he joined the faculty of Harvard Medical…
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BIOESSAYS: Why do the well-fed appear to die young?

Dietary restriction adaptively up-regulates cellular recycling mechanisms (e.g. autophagy, apoptosis) to increase resource efficiency and promote immediate reproduction. Old-age pathologies, such as cancer, are reduced as a side effect, extending lifespan in benign laboratory environments. Such benefits are unlikely to translate to the wild, where extrinsic mortality risk is high. In this video, Margo Adler…
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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity

A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease. "Now,…
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When Did Earth’s First Whiffs of Oxygen Emerge?

Today's climate change doesn't hold a candle to the chemical warfare waged on Earth more than 2 billion years ago. Before plants discovered the power of photosynthesis, single-celled life survived on chemicals, not sunlight, burning through hydrogen, methane and sulfur, among other yummy compounds. These "anaerobes" that live without oxygen were poisoned when blue-green algae…
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Vast gene-expression map yields neurological, environmental stress insights

A consortium led by scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development, and environmental conditions. Their findings paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous…
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Fuel Cells Could Provide Clues to Spark of Life

The origins of life remains one of the greatest mysteries of science. But to simulate the primordial past—and the conditions that could have given rise to the spark of life—some scientists are turning to a technology usually associated with the car of the future: fuel cells. Their usefulness lies in their very basic similarity to…
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Using Laser Fingerprinting To Identify Salmonella

Bacteria from the genus Salmonella are a major cause of food poisoning. About 40,000 cases of salmonella food poisoning are reported in the United States every year, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one million people are actually infected with the bacterium every year. Researchers have now developed a new, more rapid…
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30,000 year-old giant virus found in Siberia

A new type of giant virus called "Pithovirus" has been discovered in the frozen ground of extreme north-eastern Siberia by researchers from the Information Génomique et Structurale laboratory (CNRS/AMU), in association with teams from the Biologie à Grande Echelle laboratory (CEA/INSERM/Université Joseph Fourier), Génoscope (CEA/CNRS) and the Russian Academy of Sciences. Buried underground, this giant…
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